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Reviews


Armory Art Fair 2018

Armory Highlights 2018

 

Oh baby it’s cold outside, but as dedicated art lovers, we have trekked through the snow
to get to Armory to report on our pick of the booths that you can’t miss at this year’s
fair. Thankfully the sun is out now, so put on your wellies and get across town to
check them out.

 

Shin Gallery

 Image courtesy of Shin Gallery

Image courtesy of Shin Gallery

Probably the most visually striking booth this year, New York’s Shin Gallery presents
Jong-kyu Park’s dramatic optical work, with lines exploding throughout the booth,
drawing the viewer in. The gallery explains: “Drawing slanted lines on the front,
sides, and bottom of the given space, Park completed an illusion as if the walls were
skewed or the floor was rising up. While the lines he spread out disrupted the sense
of space, the bulky installation at the centre of the booth constantly re-enacted the
past to disturb the sense of time. The overturn of dimensions is the major context of
Park’s works.”

 

 

Gavlak

  Image courtesy of the artist and Gavlak Los Angeles / Palm Beach


Image courtesy of the artist and Gavlak Los Angeles / Palm Beach

Right next door to Shin is a very different kind of booth at Californian gallery Gavlak.
The centre of the booth features a salon-style hang of Andrew Brischler’s work, which
at first appears to be a series of paintings but on closer inspection (ok, we confess, we
spoke to the artist and he filled us in) are actually done using colouring pencils.
Brischler said the larger pieces can take over a month to complete. He takes his
inspiration from a variety of sources; “Branded Youth” was inspired by the Bruce
Weber book, while “Trash” came from the Andy Warhol movie of the same name.

 

 

Pierogi

 Patrick Jacobs, Pink Forest, 2018, courtesy of Pierogi

Patrick Jacobs, Pink Forest, 2018, courtesy of Pierogi

Drawing you into Pierogi’s booth is a huge work by Californian artist Patrick Jacobs.
Titled “Pink Forest” and made for the fair, the piece is almost 5m wide, but recedes
into the wall, creating a 3D diorama effect, using paper, plastic, foam, metal, wood,
fabric, and lighting. The gallery explains: “His dioramas, viewed through glass lenses,
present the viewer with a spatial and perceptual conundrum; we are drawn into a
space at once determinate and infinite, natural and contrived, prosaic and
otherworldly.”

 

 

Paul Kasmin Gallery

 Roxy Paine, Meeting, 2016, courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery

Roxy Paine, Meeting, 2016, courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery

Pierogi wasn’t the only gallery to lure people with a diorama, Paul Kasmin had one
too, but instead of nature, theirs focused on a more urban environment. Created by
Roxy Paine, the 3D scene is composed of a set of tiny chairs arranged in a circle,
suggestive of an AA meeting (there are even miniature cola bottles and coffee
dispensers in the corner), but no one is there yet, creating an unsettling
environment. Works by Joel Shapiro, Robert Indiana, Bernar Venet, Milton Avery,
Lee Krasner, and more are also on view at the gallery’s booth.

 

Carpenters Workshop Gallery

  Nacho Carbonell installation at Carpenters Workshop Gallery


Nacho Carbonell installation at Carpenters Workshop Gallery

First time exhibitors at Armory, Carpenters Workshop Gallery commissioned
Spanish artist Nacho Carbonell to fill their space with newly made works, recreating
the artist’s studio in the Netherlands, down to his personal workshop table. The
space is filled with his large cocoon shaped sculptors, reminiscent of honeycomb. The
gallery explained: “From smashed concrete bases that evoke ruin, surreal tree-like
forms in man-made materials of steel and metal mesh grow. These works offer a
parallel reality where objects and things are built or grown from inhospitable soil and
environments. Together these works construct a strange and uncanny forest where
one becomes lost in textural details and biomorphic shapes, a corporeal fruition of
what can grow in the aftermath of destruction.”

Words by HOLLY HOWE

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